Book Review: Glory in Romans and the Unified Purpose of God in Redemptive History

Glory in Romans and the Unified Purpose of God in Redemptive HistoryGlory in Romans and the Unified Purpose of God in Redemptive History by Donald L Berry
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This study takes up the motif of glory in Paul’s letter to the Romans, which is an under explored area of scholarship. Glory in Romans has to do with God’s glory and the display of his glory by human beings. Obviously, humans rejected that glory and fell short of it, beginning in Adam. But, in Christ, the second Adam, sons of Adam are justified and giving sure hope of future glory.

This is a helpful study. The author goes through the entire letter, focusing on Paul’s use of the doxa word group and relevant passages that may not necessarily use the word group. The study does suffer somewhat from over realized eschatology and supersessionism.

View all my reviews

Book Review: The Lord’s Supper

The Lord's SupperThe Lord’s Supper by John F. MacArthur Jr.
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book combines four sermons MacArthur preached on the Lord’s Supper from Matthew 26:17-30 and 1 Corinthians 11:17-34. These are not sermon transcripts, but more extensive outlines. There is some overlap between the sermons. Overall, it’s a helpful study. He didn’t get into some issues surrounding the supper, and he probably addressed some we don’t hear frequently. I differ with some of his interpretive conclusions and also in some of the underlying theological assumptions. It is certainly worth having if you are studying those passages, or the Lord’s Supper more generally.

View all my reviews

Book Review: The Lord’s Supper as the Sign and Meal of the New Covenant

The Lord's Supper as the Sign and Meal of the New CovenantThe Lord’s Supper as the Sign and Meal of the New Covenant by Guy Prentiss Waters
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This short book devotes a lot of space to covenant theology. It’s a typical Presbyterian treatment—covenant as the controlling theme of all scripture, two-covenant theology, etc. the actual treatment of the Lord’s Supper was decent, but basic.

View all my reviews

Book Review: Church Planting is for Wimps: How God Uses Messed-Up People to Plant Ordinary Churches That do Extraordinary Things

Church Planting Is for Wimps (Redesign): How God Uses Messed-Up People to Plant Ordinary Churches That Do Extraordinary Things (9marks)Church Planting Is for Wimps (Redesign): How God Uses Messed-Up People to Plant Ordinary Churches That Do Extraordinary Things by Mike McKinley
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Every pastor or preacher needs to read this book. Of those, especially the young preacher/pastor should read it. The older, experienced preacher/pastor should read it. The middle aged pastor/preacher should read it. Church members should read it to.

McKinley gives a view through his own eyes of the work of church revitalization. I don’t know the stats, probably most churches in this country are in a state of decline. Some recognize it and are happy to change things, just as long as the church continues doing everything the way it’s always been done and adding nothing new. Some don’t recognize it and will committedly go down with the ship. Others recognize but don’t know what to do or how to do it. As a young preacher who will eventually become a pastor, you will get one of those churches. This book will be a help to you.

View all my reviews

Book Review: Ploductivity: A Practical Theology of Tools & Wealth

Ploductivity: A Practical Theology of Tools & WealthPloductivity: A Practical Theology of Tools & Wealth by Douglas Wilson
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Pretty good book overall. I have long been a devotee of plodding, and still, Wilson, gave me many things to think about. You can think of this book as a more biblical treatment of “How To Do What You Want To Do” by Hauck, though that is a good book in its own right. I may have been inclined to cough up more stars if it weren’t for the explicit postmillennialism. Everything Wilson writes, and I do mean everything, is laced with postmillennialism as a hidden transcript. Sometimes it stitches his patchwork together with external seams. Had Spurgeon known Wilson’s writing the way he knew Bunyan’s, he might have remarked of Wilson, “Prick him and he bleeds postmill.” All that said, he does a good job with work, tools, technology, and wealth. It’s worth reading.

View all my reviews

« Previous PageNext Page »