Book Review: Conscience: What it is, How to Train it, and Loving Those Who Differ

Conscience: What It Is, How to Train It, and Loving Those Who DifferConscience: What It Is, How to Train It, and Loving Those Who Differ by Andrew David Naselli
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I have read a few books on conscience and they all have their strengths. The strengths of this book are that it is brief, not academic, a good mix of doctrinal and practical, and includes some cross-cultural missions perspective. The authors address the relevant texts and use some surprisingly concrete examples. The authors are not asking readers to agree with all their convictions, but they were open about specific examples that helps readers work through the issues. The book focuses on training, or calibrating, the conscience and gives a good bit of space to dealing with conflicts of conscience. It’s a book that can benefit every Christian.

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Book Review: The Bible Expositor’s Handbook: Old Testament

The Bible Expositor's Handbook, OT Edition: Old Testament EditionThe Bible Expositor’s Handbook, OT Edition: Old Testament Edition by Greg Harris
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is an excellent book on exposition of the Old Testament. Harris uses a consistent historical grammatical hermeneutic while looking at various Old Testament passages. He considers intertexuality, progress of revelation, biblical theology, and the nature of prophetic fulfillment. It is not exhaustive, but it is helpful and accessible.

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Book Review: The Meaning of Ecclesia in the New Testament

The Meaning of Ecclesia in the New TestamentThe Meaning of Ecclesia in the New Testament by Edward Hugh Overbey, B.A., B.D.
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a brief and useful study on the Greek word ekklesia. You can download a free Kindle version here.

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Book Review: The Kingdom of God: A Baptist Expression of Covenant & Biblical Theology

The Kingdom of God: A Baptist Expression of Covenant & Biblical TheologyThe Kingdom of God: A Baptist Expression of Covenant & Biblical Theology by Jeffrey D. Johnson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book sets out the view of 1689 federalism and does a good job distinguishing between different covenant theology views. Johnson provides a good explanation, then, of the difference between a full covenant theology, like that of Presbyterians, and the covenant theology of Reformed Baptists. So this book provides a good basis of why I am neither Presbyterian nor Reformed Baptist, though this is not all that could be said on that. The issues are core fundamental hermeneutic issues. 1689 Federalism is distinct from covenant theology but still holds to a dichotomous view of the Abrahamic covenant and partially conflates the covenants, coming near the covenant theology view of monocovenant and polyadministration. Of course, this hermeneutic yields the typical conventions of amillennialism, i.e., supersessionism, already/not yet kingdom, already/not yet binding of Satan, etc.

I was surprised, but delighted, that Johnson pointed out errors with the covenantal nomism of New Perspective and Federal Vision. There is a lot of good in this book and it is a good treatment of the biblical theology of covenants and kingdom. I appreciated the author’s tone and approach. I didn’t detect the condescension and dismissive that can often accompany these discussions. Johnson was fair in presenting his views and this is the type of writing that can be helpful, even where you disagree.

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Book Review: The Golden Ratio: The Divine Beauty of Mathematics

The Golden RatioThe Golden Ratio by Gary B. Meisner
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book is an interesting look at math history with intersections in art, architecture, engineering, natural science, biology, chemistry, astrophysics, etc. Meisner looks at the natural occurrence of phi as well as the human use of the irrational number in history.

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