Book Review: Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness

Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn DarknessDepression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness by Edward T. Welch
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Very informative. As a pastor, I should be more aware of these issues than what I am. Welch gives us a good place to start. He presents a blend of physical, medical, secular, and biblical counsel.

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Book Review: Interpreting the Wisdom Books: An Exegetical Handbook

Interpreting the Wisdom Books: An Exegetical Handbook (Handbooks for Old Testament Exegesis)Interpreting the Wisdom Books: An Exegetical Handbook by Edward M. Curtis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a helpful resource for the wisdom books of the Old Testament.

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Book Review: Why is the Lord’s Supper so Important?

Why Is the Lord's Supper So Important?Why Is the Lord’s Supper So Important? by Aubrey Sequeira
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a good basic book on the Lord’s Supper. It’s brief and readable and could be helpful for new converts, new members, or those who haven’t studied much on the subject.

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Book Review: Jesus and the Last Supper

Jesus and the Last SupperJesus and the Last Supper by Brant Pitre
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Interesting read. The book is a scholarly work but reads fairly well. The author engages thoroughly with other scholars, which can be good. However, it wears thin taking scholars seriously who’ve found much agreement in modern times that Jesus existed and was likely a Jew. It feels at times that too much weight is given to second temple Judaism literature along with early Jewish literature outside of Scripture. He does deal with the biblical data and does a good job confirming the Last Supper was indeed the Passover meal and resolves well the supposed contradictions between John and the Synoptics. Could’ve used broader biblical harmonization, particularly in the implications of eschatology.

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Book Review: How to Read Proverbs

How to Read ProverbsHow to Read Proverbs by Tremper Longman III
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book is well done and helpful in what it sets out to do. The title is truth in advertising as this book helps orient the reader of the book of Proverbs. It is not a deep dive study of wisdom literature, but that wasn’t the intention of the author. Issues like the overall organization and structural and thematic unity of the book are only touched on enough to whet your appetite. Longman doesn’t deal with intertextuality per se, but he does have a chapter for interaction between Proverbs and Job and Ecclesiastes, and a later mention of the New Testament book of James. The book particularly shines in giving attention to the fact that you must take any individual sayings in light of the whole book.

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