Book Review: The Message of the Psalter: An Eschatological Programme in the Book of Psalms

The Message of the Psalter: An Eschatological Programme in the Book of Psalm (Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplement Series 252)The Message of the Psalter: An Eschatological Programme in the Book of Psalm by David C. Mitchell
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This is an interesting study. Mitchell endeavors to trace an eschatological program through the canonical psalms. He considers historical scholarship and more modern scholarship on the predictive nature of the Psalms. I would quibble with some things here and there and felt like at times he was stretching to prove his thesis. Overall, it is a helpful study.

View all my reviews

Book Review: The Power of His Reign: An Easy Introduction to Amillennialism

The Power of His Reign: An Easy Introduction to AmillennialismThe Power of His Reign: An Easy Introduction to Amillennialism by Jonathan Ammon
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I read this book and discussed it on the Just Jerry Live podcast. We went through the book chapter by chapter over 8 episodes. Here is a link to the first episode. You can listen to those episodes if you want a fuller discussion on this book.

Ammon is open from the start about his amill position and how he got there. The book seemed to follow a natural progression from premill to amill, that was probably not unlike what the author experienced. I appreciated that openness and I think he was genuinely wanting to write something helpful.

I wouldn’t call this the best presentation of amill I have read. The book has some weaknesses that prevent it from being a serious or compelling presentation of amillennialism. For instance, he does not touch the Old Testament. If it hadn’t been for a bare mention of the book of Daniel in a light appendix, there would have been zero Old Testament references in the book. Of the New Testament passages he deals with, he didn’t really address other passages that bear on the same topic, and he didn’t address other passages that would seem to counter his views. He did a little bit of namedropping, but he did not really deal with any differing views. He spent a good bit of time on the two-age schema of all time, but he didn’t offer a scriptural definition of what an age is.

Ultimately, my differences with this book come down to the hermeneutical approach to Scripture. Amillennialism holds to a discontinuity view and a dispensational framework that defies any natural, consistent, grammatical-historical reading of all Scripture.

View all my reviews

Book Review: Amillennialism and the Age to Come: A Premillennial Critique of the Two-Age Model

Amillennialism and the Age to Come: A Premillennial Critique of the Two-Age ModelAmillennialism and the Age to Come: A Premillennial Critique of the Two-Age Model by Matt Waymeyer
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is primarily a critique of the two-age schema of amillennialism. Waymeyer works carefully through a number of issues pertaining to this framework. He gives copious footnotes and direct quotes. He presents the basic amillennial interpretation and gives space to differing views within the amill camp. He also presents the interpretation of premillennialists, and also notice the existence of different views within that camp. He attempted to present views fairly without misrepresentation. This is an excellent resource for some key issues of difference between amill and premill interpretations.

View all my reviews

Book Review: Premillennialism: Why There Must Be a Future Earthly Kingdom of Jesus

Premillennialism: Why There Must Be a Future Earthly Kingdom of JesusPremillennialism: Why There Must Be a Future Earthly Kingdom of Jesus by Michael J. Vlach
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book makes a positive case for premillennialism. Vlach does deal with some objections and alternative views on some texts, but mostly is making his case from both testaments and the overall storyline of Scripture.

View all my reviews

Book Review: The Gospel of the Kingdom: Scriptural Studies in the Kingdom of God

The Gospel of the Kingdom: Scriptural Studies in the Kingdom of GodThe Gospel of the Kingdom: Scriptural Studies in the Kingdom of God by George Eldon Ladd
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

I disagreed with a lot in this book and came to realize the problem with it is a foundational hermeneutical issue. Ladd held to a re-interpretation of Old Testament texts by the New Testament, so later revelation changed the contextual meaning of prior revelation. Though he tried to maintain some sort of continuity of the kingdom from the Old to the New Testament, he ended up with a discontinuity in the nature of the kingdom as revealed in the Old and New Testaments.

He spiritualized and generalized the kingdom to where at times he made it synonymous with salvation, eternal life, etc. He conflated conceptions of the universal lordship of Christ and the mediatorial kingdom of men on the earth. He ended up with a supersession of Israel and reformulation of the people of God to the point that his vision for the restoration of Israel fell short of the promises/covenants made to the fathers, which necessarily included a geo-political, ethnic, and territorial kingdom with Jesus Christ on the throne of his father David in Jerusalem ruling over the twelve tribes united on the land promised to Abraham.

It was an interesting read historically, but I can’t recommend it as helpful.

View all my reviews

Next Page »